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Revista N’oj Issue 3 – The Prison Industrial Complex

The Prison Industrial Complex is part of the settler-colonial project whose violence permeates the lives of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color throughout the world. This web, consisting of not only prisons but detention centers, the police, probation services, and economic exploitation of incarcerated individuals, perpetuates irreparable harm to those forced inside walls, as well as their families and their community outside. The PIC works to cage, isolate, and dis-empower people by limiting their access to the outside world both physically by restricting the flow of information (both in and out) as well as socially stigmatizing and dehumanizing hyper-policed individuals and communities. This violence includes physical and psycho-emotional assault and has made itself bare during the current pandemic due to the complete neglect of basic needs and the ongoing spread of Covid-19.

During the pandemic, detained migrants and incarcerated persons have been disproportionally impacted by the harms of the virus. Both detained and incarcerated people have called social distancing impossible due to overcrowding in prisons and detention centers. Persons forced to stay in immigration centers are afraid of retaliation for them sharing their symptoms and are threatened with solitary confinement for calling attention to sanitary conditions. Others have not been allowed to see a doctor for up to 25 days after their first mentioning symptoms to guards. Many are even forced to decide between buying food, soap, or calling their families. In July of 2020, California Judge Dolly M. Gee called for the release of children in detention facilities within 20 days. Authorities have refused to comply and release families together, instead forcing parents to decide: stay with their children together in detention centers or release them to a sponsor in the United States.

Since March of 2020 and the beginning of the pandemic’s documented spread in the United States, at least 283,759 incarcerated and detained persons have tested positive, and 1,708 have died from the virus due to conscious sanitary and medical neglect by prison guards and prison administrations. However, due to restrained testing allocation to prisons, these numbers are incredibly inaccurate and do not reflect the horrifying disregard for human life by the U.S.
government.

This edition of Revista N’oj aims to center the voices of those directly impacted by the Prison Industrial Complex both in America and abroad and accurately reflect the dialogue and acts of resistance taking place among those affected. Submit by March 1st, 2021 to lrc-editor@berkeley.edu

Topics that are of interest to Revista No’j:

●Prison conditions both before and during Covid-19●Abolition, Alternatives, and Organizing●Mass incarceration●Tools of policing inside prisons including solitary confinement and forms of deprivation●The cost of prisons for women and children●Being LGBTQA+ and incarcerated●Incarceration and Immigration●Disenfranchisement and census issues●Education while incarcerated●The cost of building and maintaining prisons●Obstacles to release from prison●Imprisonment and sensory deprivation●Community in prison●Physical and Mental Health of incarcerated folks●And other related issues you may feel are important and necessary to bring awareness to the prison industrial complex.If you would like to have your work published in Revista No’j, please send your completed first draft in an email to lrc-editor@berkeley.edu with “Post Submission Issue 3” as your subject title by ​March 1, 2021.​ Attach all drafted submissions as a Word document (do not paste it into the body of the email). Include any source links in your draft as URLs at the bottom of your document (ex. www.revistanoj.com). Include sources and references in the submission as endnotes. Please include a short bio with your submission—three to four sentences. All submissions must be your original work.Submissions:●Short form nonfiction—News, Reviews, Commentary (op-eds and essays), and report-backs, typically of fewer than 3,000 words.●Long form nonfiction—essays or reportage of typically 3,000 to 5,000 words.●Fiction, poetry, and or creative writing, open.●Photo essays—please provide some context and idea behind your work. Include captions for each photo (100-150 words).●Original Artworks of different mediums including comics, collages, paintings, drawings,etc.●We wish to make submissions accessible and possible for all persons. Please reach out if you have any questions, concerns, or accessibility needs!

 

 

Revista No’j is the new online publication of the Latinx Research Center (formerly the Center for Latino Policy Research) at the University of California, Berkeley. As part of an interdisciplinary and transAmericas research center, this project seeks to support and showcase the critical and creative work of writers, poets, performers and other artists offering perspectives on topical issues rarely covered in mainstream outlets. We, at Revista No’j, are here to provide a platform for intersectional, feminist, anti-racist, and decolonial analyses and debates on the politics and culture of our time.

Our inspiration comes from the presence and persistence of indigenous cosmologies and knowledge production originating outside of Westernized, Eurocentric world-views. We are motivated by the wide-range of thought and creativity demonstrated by indigenous, black, and afro-indigenous social movements of the Americas. We seek to publish the opinions and voices of writers, artists, and activists whose work highlight these struggles and further decolonial and anti-racist organizing on the ground. We are committed to the role of the engaged public intellectual and are dedicated to making decolonial research, theory and praxis accessible and relevant to the broad Latinx community.

Just some topics that are of interest to Revista No’j

 

 

    • Indigenous, Black and decolonial social movements

 

    • Black, Indigenous and chicanx feminisms

 

    • decolonial praxis and pedagogies

 

    • borders

 

    • the city

 

    • solidarity and coalitions

 

    • ethnic studies, third world studies and transdisciplinary research

 

    • art and resistance

 

    • spirituality and the decolonial

 

    • settler colonialism and migration in the Americas

 

    • the *everyday* resilience of the Latinx community

 

    • etc.

If you would like to have your work published in Revista No’j, please send your completed first draft in an email to revistanoj [at] gmail.com with “Post Submission” as your subject title. Attach all drafted submissions as a Word document (do not paste it into the body of the email). Include any links into your draft as URLs in the body of your draft (ex. www.revistanoj.com). Include sources and references in the submission as endnotes. Please include a short bio with your submission—three to four sentences. All submissions must be your original work.

 

 

Submissions:

    • Shortform nonfiction—News, Reviews, Commentary (op-eds and essays), and report-backs, typically of fewer than 3,000 words.

 

    • Longform nonfiction—essays or reportage of typically 3,000 to 5,000 words.

 

    • Fiction, poetry and or creative writing, open.

 

    • Photo essays—please provide some context and idea behind your work. Include captions for each photo (100-150 words).

 

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